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HP PCs - Troubleshooting wireless network and Internet (Windows 8)

This document pertains to HP and Compaq PCs using a wireless network (a router) with Windows 8.

The following sections provide detailed troubleshooting steps. Use the steps in the first section to solve most problems with a wireless network and Internet connection. If the steps in that section do not resolve the issue, go to the section that matches the network problem the computer is experiencing.

NOTE: If you are not using the latest version of Windows 8, some graphics and information in this document may vary. You can get the latest version from the Microsoft Store.

Before you begin

Windows 8 includes a network diagnostic tool and a network troubleshooter that help to identify network problems and provide possible solutions. The HP Support Assistant program also provides diagnostic checks that can aid in troubleshooting. Using these tools can help resolve many network and Internet connection problems.

Follow the instructions in one of the following sections. If the steps in that section do not successfully diagnose the issue, use one of the other methods.

Use the HP Support Assistant network diagnostics to troubleshoot a network connection

Follow these steps to diagnose and troubleshoot network connectivity issues using HP Support Assistant:

  1. From the Windows desktop, click the HPSA icon in the notification area (at the bottom right corner of the screen).

    NOTE: If HP Support Assistant is not installed on your computer, click here for instructions to download and install the latest version.
  2. If a welcome screen opens, click Next.

    Figure 1: Welcome screen

    Image: Welcome screen
  3. On the HPSA Home screen, click Internet and Security.

    Figure 2: Internet and security

    Image: HP Support Assistant
  4. Click HP Network Check.

    Figure 3: HP Network Check

    Image: Internet and security
  5. If prompted, click Yes to allow the computer to make changes.

  6. At the Network Check Welcome screen, click Next to run the network diagnostic.

  7. If the HPSA diagnostic test found no issues, close the tool. Use one of the other solutions in this document to troubleshoot your wireless connection.

    If the HPSA diagnostic test found one or more issues, continue following the steps in this section.

  8. Click Possible Root Causes.

    Figure 4: Possible Root Causes

    Possible Root Causes
  9. Click the arrow button next to one of the issues in the list of possible root causes.

    A list of solutions displays.

    Figure 5: Possible Root Cause example: No network detected

    Image: Select Error
  10. Click one of the tool icons for steps to resolve the issue, and then follow the on-screen instructions.

    Figure 6: HP Network Check tool icon

    Image: Select tool icon
  11. After completing the instructions, click Re-check.

    HP Support Assistant checks the network connectivity.

    Figure 7: Re-check

    Image: Select Re-check
  12. If necessary, repeat steps 2 through 4 until the network connectivity issue is resolved.

Use Windows 8 Network Diagnostics to troubleshoot a network connection

Windows 8 monitors the network and Internet connections. If it detects a problem, Windows 8 displays a message, and prompts you for permission to diagnose the problem. Click OK to allow Windows 8 to diagnose the problem and restore the connection.

To run the diagnostic tool manually, use one of the following options:

  • No error message is displayed, but there is no Internet or network connection:

    From the Windows desktop, right-click the Network Connection icon in the notification area, and then click Troubleshoot problems. Windows Network Diagnostics checks for problems.

    Figure 8: Troubleshoot problems selection in the notification area

    Troubleshoot problems selection in the notification area
  • The Network Connection icon is missing in the notification area:

    From the Start screen, type repair to open the Search charm, and then select Identify and repair network problems from the search results.

    Figure 9: Identify and repair network problems

    Search results for network diagnostics

    The Windows Network Diagnostic tool opens and begins detecting problems. Read and respond to any onscreen instructions that open on your screen.

Use the Windows 8 Network and Internet Troubleshooter

The Windows 8 Network and Internet Troubleshooter tests the network for problems, and automatically repairs the network connections (if applicable). Use this tool to test and repair the connection:

  1. From the Start screen, type control panel to open the Search charm, and then select Control Panel from the search results.

    Figure 10: Search results for Control Panel

    Search results for Control Panel
  2. Click View network status and tasks.

    Figure 11: View network status and tasks

    View network status and tasks in the Control Panel window
  3. Click Troubleshoot problems.

    Figure 12: Troubleshoot problems

    Troubleshoot problems option in the Network and Sharing Center window

    The Network and Internet Troubleshooter opens.

  4. Click the item that matches the problem your computer is experiencing:

    Figure 13: Network and Internet Troubleshooter

    Network and Internet Troubleshooter
    • Internet Connections: Trouble connecting to the Internet.

    • Shared Folders: Trouble accessing files and folders on other computers on the network.

    • HomeGroup: Trouble viewing computers or files in a HomeGroup.

    • Network Adapter: Check to see if the network adapter is having problems.

    • Incoming Connections: Trouble accessing this computer from another computer on the network.

  5. Click Next, and then follow the instructions to check for problems.

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Cannot connect to the wireless network or to the Internet

If the computer cannot connect to the wireless network or Internet or displays a limited access message, follow these steps to try to fix the problem.

Test the connection after performing each step. If the problem is not fixed, continue to the next step.

Step 1: Check the hardware and cables

Use the following steps to verify that your modem, adapter, and router and access points are turned on and connected correctly:

  1. Check your cable or DSL modem for disconnected cables or wires. Make sure the power cable is connected and the lights are on.

  2. Make sure that the wireless router is connected to the power adapter and modem. Make sure the lights are on.

  3. Reseat all the cables and power cords.

  4. Turn on the computer and open the Windows Desktop.

  5. On the Windows desktop, click the Network Connection icon in the notification area, and then click the name of the network.

    If the network name is not displayed, wait a minute longer to see if the name displays. If it does not display, refer to Turning on wireless communication or turning off Airplane mode .

  6. Click Connect.

    If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 2: Reset power to the router and modem

When a computer establishes a connection with a router or with the Internet, it uses several IP addresses to manage the communication. If the electrical power to the computer, the router, or the Internet service is interrupted momentarily, the IP address might change and disrupt the connections. The indicator lights on the equipment might indicate that a connection exists, but the IP addresses might not be correct. To re-establish the correct IP addresses, reset the power as follows:

  1. Press and hold the power button for at least five seconds to shut down your computer.

  2. Unplug the power to the wireless router and to the cable or DSL modem.

    Figure 14: Power cord being unplugged from the back of a router

    Power cord being unplugged from the back of a router
  3. Wait at least 30 seconds before continuing.

  4. Reconnect the power to the modem and allow it to re-establish a connection to the ISP. If the modem has indicator lights, wait until the lights indicate a connection.

  5. If using a separate wireless router, reconnect the power to the router and allow it to re-establish the connections to the modem and other components.

  6. After the modem and router have finished making connections, turn on the computer.

  7. On the Windows desktop, click the Network Connection icon in the notification area, and then click the name of the network.

    If the network name is not displayed, wait a minute longer to see if the name displays. If it does not display, refer to Using Windows 8 diagnostic and troubleshooting tools .

  8. Click Connect.

    If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 3: Perform a hard reset (notebook computers only)

On notebook PCs, perform a hard reset to troubleshoot wireless network or Internet connection problems. For instructions, see the HP Support document Performing a Hard Reset or Forced Reset . After resetting the notebook, if you can connect to the network and not the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 4: Minimize interference and moving the computer closer to the router

A wireless network router has a limited broadcast range. The further the computer is from the router, the weaker the broadcast signal. Solid objects, such as walls, metal furniture, and electrical appliances might interfere with the signal and decrease the usable range.

For testing purposes, move the computer closer to the router and minimize interference from electrical devices. If testing the connection with the computer near to the router proves that the wireless connection is working, you can move the computer to determine the range of the connection. To extend the usable range of the wireless network router, consider purchasing a different antenna from the router manufacturer, or use a signal repeater.

If the test fails with the computer and the router in the same room, continue to the next step to force the device to re-establish all connection values.

Step 5: Connect to a working and compatible network

When a computer detects a wireless network, if it has been connected to that network in the past, it tries to re-establish the connection. However, the connection might not be to the correct network.

To determine what network the computer is attempting to connect to and to select the network you want, do the following:

  1. From the Windows desktop, click the Network Connection icon in the notification area see if any wireless networks are connected.

  2. If connected, click the name of the network and then click Disconnect.

  3. Click the name of the network you want and click Connect.

    NOTE: The network you select might require you to enter security credentials such as pass phrase, before it makes a connection.

    Figure 15: Networks

    Available Wi-Fi Networks list

    Once the computer is connected to the correct network, check for Internet access. If the computer does not have Internet access or has limited access, continue with the next step.

Step 6: Connect the computer directly to the router using an Ethernet cable

Connect the computer directly to the network router using an Ethernet cable to determine if the connection problem lies with the router settings or with the wireless signal. You do not need to turn off the wireless network device on the computer during testing.

  1. Move the computer closer to the router (if needed) and connect an Ethernet cable from one of the available ports on the router to the network port on the computer.

  2. Wait for one minute, and then check the Network Connection icon in the notification area on the Windows desktop.

    • If the icon has an X in the lower corner (), the connection is not working. Right-click the icon, and then click Troubleshoot problems. Windows Network Diagnostics checks for problems. If Window Network Diagnostics is not able to fix the issue, the router is not working properly. Refer to Resetting and reconfiguring the router

    • If the icon does not have an X in the lower corner (), the connection is working. Disconnect the Ethernet cable from the computer, and manually setup a new connection to the wireless network.

Step 7: Reset and reconfigure the router

If you have installed a new router or made changes to the router settings while trying to fix connection problems, reset the router to its factory settings, then run the manufacturer set up program to configure the router.

Use the following steps as a general guideline, but see the user guide for the router for model-specific information.

  1. Enter the default IP addresses for the router into the URL address field on the browser. The following list provides default IP addresses for several routers:

    • 3Com: http://192.168.1.1

    • D-Link: http://192.168.0.1

    • Linksys: http://192.168.1.1

    • Netgear: http://192.168.0.1

    NOTE: These IP addresses are provided for informational purposes only and might not work with all router models.
  2. When the home page for the router displays, you might need to type a password to perform configuration tasks. See the user guide for model-specific information.

    NOTE: Most manufacturers allow you to reset the router to a default factory condition and then open router configuration screens.
  3. When you have administrator access to the router, change the default name (or SSID) of the router.

  4. Set up Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) or wireless encryption (WEP), to prevent other computers from connecting to your home network.

  5. Enter a network access password, sometimes called a passphrase. Make sure to pick a password that is easy to remember, such as a phone number that you dial often or a phrase that is familiar.

If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 8: Update the router firmware to troubleshoot a network connection

Outdated firmware might prevent the router from accessing the Internet or certain Web pages. Log into the configuration menu for the router (as was done in the previous section) and use the menu to update the firmware dedicated to the router. Consult the User Guide that came with your manual for information on how to perform a firmware update. It is a good idea to connect the computer directly to the router using its network cable when doing the firmware update.

If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 9: Remove and reinstall wireless network card in Device Manager

Removing and reinstalling the wireless network card in Device Manager restores the wireless network to its default settings and can resolve the issue.

Follow these steps to uninstall and reinstall the wireless network card.

  1. From the Start screen, type device manager to open the Search charm, and then select Device Manager from the search results.

    Figure 16: Device Manager

    Device Manager in Search
  2. Click the drop-down arrow next to Network adapters.

    Figure 17: Network adapters

    Image: Network adapters
  3. Right-click your wireless network, and then select Uninstall.

    Figure 18: Uninstall

    Image: Uninstall
  4. When the Confirm Device Uninstall screen displays, click OK.

    The computer uninstalls the wireless network.

    Figure 19: Confirm Device Uninstall

    Image: Confirm Device Uninstall
  5. At top of the Device Manager window, click Action, and then select Scan for hardware changes.

    The computer reinstalls wireless network, and the wireless network displays under Network adapters.

    Figure 20: Scan for hardware changes

    Scan for hardware changes selection in Device Manager window

If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 10: Restore the default settings in BIOS

This section describes how to restore the default settings in BIOS. Select your type of computer for specific steps:

Notebook PCs

Follow these steps to restore the default settings in BIOS for your notebook.

  1. Restart your notebook.

  2. After the computer restarts, press F10 repeatedly until the BIOS menu displays.

  3. Once the BIOS menu displays, press F9 to restore factory defaults.

  4. Select Yes to confirm.

  5. Press F10 to save changes and exit.

  6. Select Yes to confirm.

    The computer restarts using the default settings.

Desktops and All-in-One PCs

Follow these steps to restore the default settings in BIOS for your desktop or All-in-One.

  1. Restart your computer.

  2. After the computer restarts, press F10 repeatedly until BIOS menu displays.

  3. In the File tab, use the up or down arrow keys to select Default Setup, and then press enter.

  4. Use up or down arrow keys to select Restore Factory Settings as Default.

  5. Select OK to confirm.

  6. Press F10 to save changes and exit.

  7. Select Yes to confirm.

    The computer restarts using the default settings.

After restoring the default BIOS settings, if you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 11: Install the updated Wireless LAN driver and BIOS

If no network connection icon is displayed within 15 to 30 seconds after enabling the wireless network, or if a Windows Device not Found error message displays, the software driver might be missing or corrupt. To fix this, download and install the latest drivers and BIOS from the HP Web site.

To get the updated wireless LAN adapter drivers and latest version of the BIOS for your computer, go to the HP Consumer Support page and search for updated drivers. You must know the exact model number or product number for your computer. Be sure to select the correct operating system.

If the wireless adapter you are using was purchased separately, consult the manufacturer's Web site for the latest software.

NOTE: If the computer cannot connect to the Internet, use another computer to download the files to an external storage device. Install the updated drivers from external storage device.

After updating the drivers and BIOS, if you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 12: Configure wireless device power management options (notebook computers only)

You can configure most wireless devices to turn off power to reduce the power drain on the battery. This is usually not a problem when the notebook is connected to an AC power adapter. However, when operating on battery power, you can turn off the adapter to save power. To disable this power setting, do the following steps:

  1. From the Start screen, type device manager to open the Search charm, and then select Device Manager from search results.

    Figure 21: Search results for Device Manager

    Device Manager search results
  2. Double-click Network Adapters to expand the list, right-click the wireless (Wi-Fi) adapter in the list, and then select Properties.

    Figure 22: Wi-Fi Adaptor Properties

    Wi-Fi Adapter Properties in Device Manager
  3. On the properties window for the adapter, click the Power Management tab.

  4. Uncheck Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power option, and then click OK.

    Figure 23: Wi-Fi Adapter Properties

    Wi-Fi Adapter Properties tab

Close the Device Manager, restart the notebook computer, and then attempt to reconnect to the wireless network. If you can connect to the network and to the Internet, you are done. If not, continue with the next step.

Step 13: Perform a Microsoft System Restore to troubleshoot a network connection in Windows 8

If the computer was able to connect to the wireless network in the past, but now cannot connect, perform a Microsoft System Restore. For more information, refer to Using Microsoft System Restore (Windows 8) .

If you have completed all the steps and still cannot connect to the wireless network, contact HP for support.

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Windows is asking for my User Name and Password, or network security key (passphrase)

A User Name and Password or network security key can be important for keeping your network secure. However, if you have not set a User Name and Password, or if you have forgotten or cannot find the network security key, this can prevent access to the network. Follow the instructions in one of the following sections:

Windows 8 is asking for a network security key (passphrase)

A network security key or passphrase might have been entered by the person who set up the network, or the Internet Service Provider (ISP) might have provided a security key.

Figure 24: Enter the network security key

Enter the network security key

If you do not know or do not remember the security key, you can use one of the following methods to get it:

  • Check the wireless router for a label that displays the network security key.

  • If the security key was sent to you by the Internet Service Provider (ISP), contact the ISP to retrieve the key.

  • Use one of the following methods to view or change the security key:

Find the security key on another computer that is connected to the network

If another computer is connected to the network, you can use that computer to display the network security key. Follow these steps to view the network security key on a computer using Windows 8:

  1. From the Windows desktop, click the Network Connection icon in the notification area to display the available networks.

  2. Right-click the name of the network, and then click View connection properties.

    Figure 25: View connection properties selection

    View connection properties selection
  3. Click the Security tab, then check the box next to Show characters.

    Figure 26: Wireless Network Properties window

    Wireless Network Properties window

    The Network security key is displayed.

Connect to the router using a network cable

If you have forgotten the network security key, you can connect a network cable from the computer to the wireless router. This allows you to access the router settings and view or change the security key. Follow these steps to view the security key using a network cable:

  1. Connect a network cable from a network port on the computer to one on the wireless router.

  2. Wait for Windows to connect to the router.

  3. Open a Web browser and type in the router IP address to connect to the router. See the following table for common router IP addresses, user names, and passwords.

    NOTE: The information listed in the table is commonly used by popular router manufacturers. If the information is not correct for your router, check with the manufacturer.
    Common Router Settings
    Router Brand Name
    Router IP Address
    User Name
    Password
    3Com
    http://192.168.1.1
    admin
    D-Link
    http://192.168.0.1
    admin
    Linksys
    http://192.168.1.1
    admin
    Netgear
    http://192.168.0.1
    admin
    password
  4. If prompted, enter the default router user name and password.

  5. Once you have entered the router configuration screens, search for the security key or passphrase. The key might be listed in a section or tab labeled Wireless Security.

I have not set up a User Name and Password for my network, but Windows is asking for them

If Windows prompts you to enter a User Name and Password to connect to a network, manually configure the network connection to resolve the issue.

Figure 27: User name and Password fields

User name and Password fields

Use the following steps to manually configure the desired wireless network:

  1. From the Start screen, type control panel to open the Search charm, and then select Control Panel from the search results.

    Figure 28: Search results for Control Panel

    Search results for Control Panel
  2. Click View network status and tasks.

    Figure 29: Control Panel

    View network status and tasks
  3. In the Network and Sharing Center window, click Set up a new connection or network.

    Figure 30: Set up a new connection or network

    Set up a new connection or network selection option in the Network and Sharing Center window
  4. In the Choose a connection option window, select Manually connect to a wireless network, and then click Next.

    Figure 31: Manually connect to a wireless network

    Manually connect to a wireless network selection window
  5. Type the required wireless network information, and then click Next.

    • Network name

    • Security type (Must be the same security method as set in the wireless router)

    • Encryption type

    • Security Key

    • Select Start this connection automatically

    Figure 32: Network information

    Manually connect to a wireless network in Network information
    NOTE: If the wireless network already exists, when prompted, select Use the existing network. The information replaces the previous values that are causing the connection problem.
  6. Click Close.

    Figure 33: Successfully added My Network

    Successfully added My Network

    The computer should connect to the wireless network automatically. If it does not connect, continue with the next step.

  7. From the Windows desktop, click the Network Connection icon in the notification area, and then click the name of the network.

  8. Click Connect.

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Wireless connection is slow

Use the following steps to resolve slow wireless connections.

Test the connection after performing each step. If the problem is not fixed, continue to the next step.

Step 1: Move the computer closer to the router

A wireless network router has a limited broadcast range. The further the computer is from the router, the weaker the broadcast signal. Solid objects, such as walls, metal furniture, and electrical appliances might interfere with the signal and decrease the usable range.

For testing purposes, move the computer closer to the router and minimize interference from electrical devices. If testing the connection with the computer near to the router proves that the wireless connection is working, you can move the computer to determine the range of the connection. To extend the usable range of the wireless network router, consider purchasing a different antenna from the router manufacturer, or use a signal repeater.

If the test fails with the computer and the router in the same room, continue to the next step to force the device to re-establish all connection values.

Step 2: Install updated Wireless LAN Driver

Downloading and installing the latest wireless LAN adapter driver can resolve many issues with a slow wireless Internet connection. Follow these steps to use Device Manager to find the latest WLAN driver:

  1. From the Start screen, type device manager to open the Search charm, and then select Device Manager from the search results.

    Figure 34: Search results for Device Manager

    Search results for Device Manager
  2. Double-click Network adapters, then right-click the name of the Wireless Adapter and select Update Driver Software.

    Figure 35: Update Driver Software selection

    Update Driver Software selection window
  3. Click Search automatically for updated driver software.

    Figure 36: Update Driver Software window

    Update Driver Software window
  4. If an updated driver is found, follow the instructions to install it.

    If Device Manager does not find an updated driver, you can check the wireless adapter manufacturer's Web site.

  5. In Device Manager, right-click the name of the adapter, and then click Properties.

    Figure 37: Properties selection

    Properties selection window
  6. Click the Driver tab. Make a note of the driver provider, date and version.

    Figure 38: Wi-Fi Adapter Driver Properties

    Wi-Fi Adapter Properties window driver
  7. Check the driver provider's Web site for an updated driver.

Step 3: Adjust Windows 8 performance settings (notebook computers only)

Watching videos over a wireless connection takes significant processing power. The video can skip (drop frames) when other software programs are active. Close any open software programs and try viewing again.

For even better performance, prevent unwanted software programs from opening with Windows and adjust Windows 8 performance settings. For more helpful tips on how you can increase performance, see Improving System Performance Without Adding Memory (Windows 8) .

Follow the instructions in one of the following sections. If the steps in that section do not improve performance, use one of the other methods.

Configure wireless device power management options

Most wireless devices can be configured to turn off power to reduce the power drain on the battery. This is usually not a problem when the notebook is connected to an AC power adapter. However, when operating on battery power, the adapter can be turned off to save power. To disable this power setting, do the following steps.

  1. From the Start screen, type device manager to open the Search charm, and then select Device Manager from the search results.

    Figure 39: Search results for Device Manager

    Search results for Device Manager
  2. Double-click Network Adapters to expand the list, right-click the wireless (Wi-Fi) adapter in the list, and then select Properties.

    Figure 40: Device Manager

    Device Manager window
  3. In the adapter properties window, click the Power Management tab.

  4. Remove the check mark next to Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power, and then click OK.

    Figure 41: Wi-Fi Adapter Properties

    Wi-Fi Adapter Properties tab window

Close the Device Manager, restart the notebook computer, and attempt to reconnect to the wireless network.

Select a power saving mode for the battery

If your wireless connection suddenly stops working when your notebook is operating on battery power, you might want to disable some of the power saver settings.

Notebook computers use power settings to balance performance and battery life for users. If the power option is set to lower power setting to maximize battery life, it will reduce power to the network adapter. To avoid wireless issues, set the Power Saving Mode settings to Maximum Performance for both battery power and when plugged into the AC power adapter.

NOTE: Setting the Power Saving Mode to Maximum Performance decreases battery life.
  1. From the Start screen, type power plan to open the Search charm, and then select Choose a power plan from the search results.

    Figure 42: Search results for Power Plan

    Search results for Power Plan
  2. On the Power Options window, select the Balanced (recommended), or HP Recommended (recommended) power plan.

    Figure 43: Power Options

    Power options in the Control Panel
  3. Click Change plan settings.

    Figure 44: Change plan settings

    Change plan settings in Power Options
  4. Click Change advanced power settings.

    Figure 45: Edit Plan Settings

    Edit Plan Settings window change advanced power settings
  5. Click the Plus sign (+) next to Wireless Adapter Settings and Power Saver Mode.

  6. Select Maximum Performance from the drop-down list next to both On Battery and Plugged in.

    Figure 46: Power Options

    Power Options window

Restart the notebook PC and attempt to reconnect to the wireless network.

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Turning on Wi-Fi or turning off Airplane mode (portable devices only)

Wireless communication (Wi-Fi) can be turned on and off in Windows or using a keyboard key or button. These settings work independent of each other. It is possible for the wireless device LED on the keyboard to glow blue even if communication is turned off in Windows. First check the status of the wireless device LED. If the LED glows blue but the wireless device is turned off, you can use the PC Settings in Windows to turn on the wireless devices.

Follow the instructions in one of the following sections.

NOTE: You cannot turn off Airplane Mode using a keyboard key or button. Turn off Airplane Mode in Windows using the steps in the first section.

Turning on the wireless device

The action of the Windows control is independent of the wireless device power switch. It is possible for the wireless device LED to glow blue because power is being sent to the device, although the device is turned off.

NOTE: Turning on the wireless devices automatically disables Airplane Mode.

To verify the status of the installed wireless devices, follow the steps below.

  1. From the Start screen, type wireless devices to open the Search charm, and then select Turn wireless devices on or off from the search results.

    Figure 47: Search results for wireless devices

    Search results for wireless devices
  2. On the Network section of PC settings, check the status of wireless devices. If Wi-Fi is turned Off, click the toggle switch to turn it On.

    Figure 48: Wireless devices On/Off switch

    Wireless devices On/Off switch window
    NOTE: If you cannot click the toggle switch, the wireless device is turned off using the keyboard key or button. Refer to Turning on devices using the wireless key or button .
    NOTE: If the Wireless window displays the text No wireless devices are available, either the wireless network connection or the network adapter is disabled. To resolve this issue, use Windows Network Diagnostics. For more information, refer to Using Windows 8 diagnostic and troubleshooting tools

    Your wireless network device(s) are now turned on.

Turning on devices using the wireless key or button

Most notebook computers have a wireless keyboard key, switch, or button on the case that turns the wireless network device on or off. In some cases, the wireless keyboard key or button might be disabled by accidentally pressing it. The wireless button or switch is usually found as one of the F keys on the keyboard or as an illuminated button above the keyboard.

NOTE: You cannot turn off Airplane Mode using a keyboard key or button. Turn off Airplane Mode in Windows using the steps in the previous section.

Figure 49: Example of a wireless keyboard key (yours might be different)

 Example of a wireless keyboard key (yours may be different)

The indicator light glows blue when the wireless communication devices are turned on. When the devices are disabled, the light glows amber.

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